Teacher strike set for March 26

Clacton and Frinton Gazette: Teacher strike set for March 26 Teacher strike set for March 26

Teachers at schools across Essex are set to walk out of their classrooms on strike next month.

The one-day national strike will mean thousands of children will be forced to stay at home on Wednesday, March 26, after teachers announced the industrial action over pay and pensions.

The action by the National Union of Teachers will be the latest in a long-running dispute and unions are blaming Education Secretary Michael Gove for “persistent refusals” to address their complaints.

The last action planned for the end of November was called off after it looked like the two sides would get around the negotiating table.

However, Essex regional NUT representative Jerry Glazier said after 17 weeks of no contact, the NUT has decided to take action.

Mr Glazier said: “There had been an indication the Secretary of State wanted to enter into negotiations with us and other unions.

“Seventeen weeks since we were told that, we have had no meaningful discussion and he has refused to have specific meetings with us and others.

“So we have announced our intention to strike on March 26.

“If he wants to enter into negotiations we will happily do so. If it can be resolved, a strike would not be necessary.

“The ball is firmly back in Mr Gove’s court.”

He added he expected a fairly substantial turnout in support of the strike across Essex schools.

The dispute centres on the introduction of a new performance- related pay structure and tougher pension package.

The NASUWT is meeting this week to decide whether to strike again

Comments (11)

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11:24am Tue 11 Feb 14

missy@maldon says...

So it's ok for the children to lose a day of schooling if the teachers say so, but try to take them out for family time we get a fine !
So it's ok for the children to lose a day of schooling if the teachers say so, but try to take them out for family time we get a fine ! missy@maldon

2:54pm Tue 11 Feb 14

FamouSam says...

Austerity everywhere, infrastructure creaking (failing?) with no money to go around, Barclays announces 7,000 job cuts and...........the teachers unions go on strike for more money.

British students have been slipping down the global league tables for many years now because the unions prevent change. We need to pay good teachers more, boot out bad teachers, modernise the whole system and not have the unions in the way at every opportunity.

Change the process or continue to slip further and further behind the rest of the world..

http://en.wikipedia.
org/wiki/Programme_f
or_International_Stu
dent_Assessment

http://en.wikipedia.
org/wiki/List_of_cou
ntries_by_student_pe
rformance
Austerity everywhere, infrastructure creaking (failing?) with no money to go around, Barclays announces 7,000 job cuts and...........the teachers unions go on strike for more money. British students have been slipping down the global league tables for many years now because the unions prevent change. We need to pay good teachers more, boot out bad teachers, modernise the whole system and not have the unions in the way at every opportunity. Change the process or continue to slip further and further behind the rest of the world.. http://en.wikipedia. org/wiki/Programme_f or_International_Stu dent_Assessment http://en.wikipedia. org/wiki/List_of_cou ntries_by_student_pe rformance FamouSam

6:33pm Tue 11 Feb 14

montygirl says...

The teachers don't impose the fine, that was a government policy, the two are not linked. Hence why people are petitioning government to reverse the decision so the comment above does not actually make sense. Holidaying out of term time is cheaper and it is ridiculous that it costs three times more to holiday in school holidays for the same break but the anger should be aimed at the holiday companies and the government doing nothing about it. Teachers are not allowed time off during term time and also get penalised even if they don't have children by having to take their holidays in school holidays so costs them just as much and I'm sure many people would complain if they did have holiday in term time.
The 10 days that used to be allowed was fair and had to be taken at once. The unfairness comes when people abuse it . It seems ironic that the social problems of this country are put at the feet of poor parenting yet this government seems hell bent on shortening the quality time we actually get to enjoy with our children by allowing breaks to be so expensive and wanting to shorten holidays and keep kids at school for longer hours so they spend less and less time with their family or enjoying any leisure time!
The teachers don't impose the fine, that was a government policy, the two are not linked. Hence why people are petitioning government to reverse the decision so the comment above does not actually make sense. Holidaying out of term time is cheaper and it is ridiculous that it costs three times more to holiday in school holidays for the same break but the anger should be aimed at the holiday companies and the government doing nothing about it. Teachers are not allowed time off during term time and also get penalised even if they don't have children by having to take their holidays in school holidays so costs them just as much and I'm sure many people would complain if they did have holiday in term time. The 10 days that used to be allowed was fair and had to be taken at once. The unfairness comes when people abuse it . It seems ironic that the social problems of this country are put at the feet of poor parenting yet this government seems hell bent on shortening the quality time we actually get to enjoy with our children by allowing breaks to be so expensive and wanting to shorten holidays and keep kids at school for longer hours so they spend less and less time with their family or enjoying any leisure time! montygirl

1:50pm Wed 12 Feb 14

calamity says...

Disgraceful act on the teachers' part. All working people are struggling and they and the fire fighters get plenty of pay for what they do.
Disgraceful act on the teachers' part. All working people are struggling and they and the fire fighters get plenty of pay for what they do. calamity

5:53pm Wed 12 Feb 14

/@|_|@\ says...

Teachers resent the changes imposed upon them such as pay for performance and there is maybe some merit to their reluctance: in order to achieve high performance, the majority of their work is judged by exam pass rates and overall grades. This can and probably would, deteriorate into "teaching to the exam" which any good teacher rejects.

I think one way around the holiday expense is rather simple -- if PARENTS would accept it. It is a scheme that has been tried many places (around the world) and proven to work: year round schooling with holidays staggered. Having kids in different schools has proven manageable; the kids aren't forced into a 8 or 10 week hiatus where the following two weeks is spent playing catch-up; and vacations can be scheduled "off-season". The major impediment to the continuation of that scheme here where live was the parents. We had four weeks off every ten or something like it. That and national (bank) holidays worked well for us and many others. Alas, we were in the minority despite the blindingly obvious advantages, overall.

The irony is sad, really.
Teachers resent the changes imposed upon them such as pay for performance and there is maybe some merit to their reluctance: in order to achieve high performance, the majority of their work is judged by exam pass rates and overall grades. This can and probably would, deteriorate into "teaching to the exam" which any good teacher rejects. I think one way around the holiday expense is rather simple -- if PARENTS would accept it. It is a scheme that has been tried many places (around the world) and proven to work: year round schooling with holidays staggered. Having kids in different schools has proven manageable; the kids aren't forced into a 8 or 10 week hiatus where the following two weeks is spent playing catch-up; and vacations can be scheduled "off-season". The major impediment to the continuation of that scheme here where live was the parents. We had four weeks off every ten or something like it. That and national (bank) holidays worked well for us and many others. Alas, we were in the minority despite the blindingly obvious advantages, overall. The irony is sad, really. /@|_|@\

10:32am Thu 13 Feb 14

keith_l says...

Actually, teachers are NOT judged by exam results - they are judged by overall improvement in the acheivement of their pupils, supported by classroom observations by senior colleagues.

The main issue of this dispute is that poor teachers expect to continually progress up the pay scales - a structure that most private sector companies abolished 20-30 years ago.
Actually, teachers are NOT judged by exam results - they are judged by overall improvement in the acheivement of their pupils, supported by classroom observations by senior colleagues. The main issue of this dispute is that poor teachers expect to continually progress up the pay scales - a structure that most private sector companies abolished 20-30 years ago. keith_l

3:06pm Thu 13 Feb 14

/@|_|@\ says...

... and how is "overall improvement in the achievement of their pupils" judged? Generally, I suggest, by grades and exams. By what other methods do we measure their learning?

And, I believe that we give far too little credit to teachers and, like fire and police, we entrust our lives and those of our children to them. Their pay and societal respect ought reflect that responsibility. So, please, don't belittle teachers.
... and how is "overall improvement in the achievement of their pupils" judged? Generally, I suggest, by grades and exams. By what other methods do we measure their learning? And, I believe that we give far too little credit to teachers and, like fire and police, we entrust our lives and those of our children to them. Their pay and societal respect ought reflect that responsibility. So, please, don't belittle teachers. /@|_|@\

3:56pm Thu 13 Feb 14

keith_l says...

/@|_|@\ wrote:
... and how is "overall improvement in the achievement of their pupils" judged? Generally, I suggest, by grades and exams. By what other methods do we measure their learning?

And, I believe that we give far too little credit to teachers and, like fire and police, we entrust our lives and those of our children to them. Their pay and societal respect ought reflect that responsibility. So, please, don't belittle teachers.
I wasn't belittling teachers in any way - read my post. Note the word "poor". Most teachers do not fall into this category and will progress at least as well, if not better, up the pay scales than they would have done before.
[quote][p][bold]/@|_|@\[/bold] wrote: ... and how is "overall improvement in the achievement of their pupils" judged? Generally, I suggest, by grades and exams. By what other methods do we measure their learning? And, I believe that we give far too little credit to teachers and, like fire and police, we entrust our lives and those of our children to them. Their pay and societal respect ought reflect that responsibility. So, please, don't belittle teachers.[/p][/quote]I wasn't belittling teachers in any way - read my post. Note the word "poor". Most teachers do not fall into this category and will progress at least as well, if not better, up the pay scales than they would have done before. keith_l

5:12pm Thu 13 Feb 14

/@|_|@\ says...

Ah. Often that word "poor" is not meant literally but as a snub (as in "oh, poor ol Jack has to put new tyres on his Roller").
Ah. Often that word "poor" is not meant literally but as a snub (as in "oh, poor ol Jack has to put new tyres on his Roller"). /@|_|@\

5:54pm Thu 13 Feb 14

montygirl says...

Trouble is many people think teachers have a cushy time.I agree is hard to swallow when everyone else is being urged and forced to take pay cuts or have pay frozen but these people are educating our children in sometimes challenging circumstances depending on what the children are like and not only act as teachers but nurturers amongst other things with all the social issues of the UK. It s a hard pill to swallow but I think many people think teachers do a 9-3 job and have copious amounts of time off when in reality this is not true. They understand that they have to mark and put in extra hours but then bare the brunt of government policies/targets along with the wrath of parents when all they want to do is teach children not fill in copious amounts of paperwork! This government and successive governments also think that all children will achieve academically when in reality this is not always the case as we seem to have a one size fits all outlook instead of looking at the whole child!
Trouble is many people think teachers have a cushy time.I agree is hard to swallow when everyone else is being urged and forced to take pay cuts or have pay frozen but these people are educating our children in sometimes challenging circumstances depending on what the children are like and not only act as teachers but nurturers amongst other things with all the social issues of the UK. It s a hard pill to swallow but I think many people think teachers do a 9-3 job and have copious amounts of time off when in reality this is not true. They understand that they have to mark and put in extra hours but then bare the brunt of government policies/targets along with the wrath of parents when all they want to do is teach children not fill in copious amounts of paperwork! This government and successive governments also think that all children will achieve academically when in reality this is not always the case as we seem to have a one size fits all outlook instead of looking at the whole child! montygirl

7:48pm Thu 13 Feb 14

/@|_|@\ says...

You are so right, montygirl.
You are so right, montygirl. /@|_|@\

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